All Things Considered for November 9, 2018 Hear the All Things Considered program for November 9, 2018

All Things Considered

The U.S. military needed skilled operators to handle the telephones in World War I. Known as the Hello Girls, 223 U.S. women served in France. Some worked near the front lines with Gen. John "Black Jack" Pershing, the top U.S. commander. Here, the women work in Seine, France, in 1918. Their story was largely forgotten, but is being recognized on the 100th anniversary of the end of the war. U.S. Army Signal Corps Archives hide caption

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U.S. Army Signal Corps Archives

History

100 Years On, The 'Hello Girls' Are Recognized For World War I Heroics

More than 200 American women played a crucial role in the war as telephone operators. But when the shooting stopped, they weren't considered veterans and their story was largely forgotten. Until now.

Little Nature Chris Joss
Too Much Birthday (Instrumental) People Under The Stairs
Tughra - Instrumental Shahin Asna

There's been an increase in vaping in teens, but e-cigarette manufacturers say it's a safer alternative to smoking. Martina Paraninfi/Getty Images hide caption

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Martina Paraninfi/Getty Images

FDA Cracks Down On E-Cigarette Sales To Curb Teen Vaping

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Mourners comfort each other Thursday during a vigil at the Thousand Oaks Civic Arts Plaza for the victims of the mass shooting at Borderline Bar and Grill in Thousand Oaks, Calif. Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

Another Mass Shooting? 'Compassion Fatigue' Is A Natural Reaction

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The U.S. military needed skilled operators to handle the telephones in World War I. Known as the Hello Girls, 223 U.S. women served in France. Some worked near the front lines with Gen. John "Black Jack" Pershing, the top U.S. commander. Here, the women work in Seine, France, in 1918. Their story was largely forgotten, but is being recognized on the 100th anniversary of the end of the war. U.S. Army Signal Corps Archives hide caption

toggle caption
U.S. Army Signal Corps Archives

100 Years On, The 'Hello Girls' Are Recognized For World War I Heroics

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/659349910/666345245" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

All Things Considered