All Things Considered for December 26, 2018 Hear the All Things Considered program for December 26, 2018

All Things Considered

Author N.K. Jemisin won her third Hugo Award this year for The Stone Sky. Laura Hanifin hide caption

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Laura Hanifin

Author Interviews

At The End Of The Year, N.K. Jemisin Ponders The End Of The World

Jemisin is the only author to win three Hugo Awards in a row — for her Broken Earth trilogy, which begins with an apocalypse. She says she likes to explore what apocalypses mean for different people.

Kim Morrison, (right) co-owner of Beanz & Co. Cafe in Avon, Conn., with her employee, Nick Sinacori, as they serve customers during their opening week. David DesRoches/Connecticut Public Radio hide caption

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David DesRoches/Connecticut Public Radio

A Connecticut Cafe Provides Jobs For Adults With Disabilities

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Just in time for New Year's Eve, Utah lowered its blood alcohol content limit to .05 percent for drunken driving. That means about half as many drinks for a lot of people. Philippe Turpin /Getty Images/Photononstop RF hide caption

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Philippe Turpin /Getty Images/Photononstop RF

Utah First In The Nation To Lower Its DUI Limit To .05 Percent

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Author N.K. Jemisin won her third Hugo Award this year for The Stone Sky. Laura Hanifin hide caption

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Laura Hanifin

At The End Of The Year, N.K. Jemisin Ponders The End Of The World

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A cubesat, like this briefcase-sized MarCO, was key to relaying telemetry during the recent InSight mission to Mars. It was the first time this kind of mini-spacecraft had flown into deep space. FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images

What's Next For Tiny Satellites?

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Sharon Sakamoto shows two family photos of Eileen Okada and her other older siblings, who spent part of their childhood living in a barrack behind barbed wire at an Idaho prison camp the U.S. government named the Minidoka War Relocation Center. The third photo is a portrait of their father, Roy Sakamoto, as a young boy. Jovelle Tamayo for NPR hide caption

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Jovelle Tamayo for NPR

Some Japanese-Americans Wrongfully Imprisoned During WWII Oppose Census Question

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