All Things Considered for January 27, 2019 Hear the All Things Considered program for January 27, 2019

All Things Considered

Henry Winkler, who has dyslexia, has spent his life struggling to read books. "It never dawned on me that I would have my name on a book," Winkler tells NPR's Michel Martin. Christopher Polk/NBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images hide caption

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Christopher Polk/NBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images

Author Interviews

Dyslexia Made Henry Winkler Feel 'Stupid' For Years. Now, He's A Best-Selling Author

The Emmy-winning actor is lesser known for his work writing for children. But he calls his book series, about the adventures and struggles of a dyslexic child, his proudest accomplishment.

Edward Huang (right) stands by a sign with his restaurant's name, Zai Lai, as (from left) Greg Ferguson and Skilynn Santiago prepare a customer's order in New York City. The name is inspired by the Mandarin phrase relatives in Taiwan often say when Huang leaves after a visit — zai lai, or "come again." Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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Hansi Lo Wang/NPR

Chinese, Taiwanese Restaurants Drop 'Golden' And 'Dragon' To Take On Mandarin Names

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Henry Winkler, who has dyslexia, has spent his life struggling to read books. "It never dawned on me that I would have my name on a book," Winkler tells NPR's Michel Martin. Christopher Polk/NBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Christopher Polk/NBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images

Dyslexia Made Henry Winkler Feel 'Stupid' For Years. Now, He's A Best-Selling Author

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/689070922/689191305" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

All Things Considered