All Things Considered for March 28, 2019 Hear the All Things Considered program for March 28, 2019

All Things Considered

Female mosquitoes searching for a meal of blood detect people partly by using a special olfactory receptor to home in on our sweat. Luis Robayo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Luis Robayo/AFP/Getty Images

Shots - Health News

How Mosquitoes Sniff Out Human Sweat To Find Us

Female mosquitoes searching for a meal of blood detect people partly by using a special olfactory receptor to home in on our sweat. The finding could lead to new approaches for better repellents.

Tetrishead Zoe Keating
Cryin Blue Angels
You The Dining Rooms
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I'm Shakin' Rooney
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New York on Thursday sued the billionaire Sackler family behind OxyContin, joining a growing list of state and local governments alleging the family's company, Purdue Pharma, sparked the nation's opioid crisis by putting hunger for profits over patient safety. Jessica Hill/AP hide caption

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Jessica Hill/AP

New York Lawsuit Claims Sackler Family Illegally Profited From Opioid Epidemic

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Phase II Mildlife
Brace Yourself Jason µ-Ziq
Westbound D Train Quantic

The sea squirt Ascidia sydneiensis, a tubelike animal that squirts water out of its body when alarmed, is one of 48 additional nonnative marine species in the Galapagos Islands documented in a newly published study. Previously, researchers knew of only five. Courtesy of Jim Carlton hide caption

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Courtesy of Jim Carlton

Dozens Of Nonnative Marine Species Have Invaded The Galapagos Islands

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Elisapie's latest album, The Ballad of the Runaway Girl, is out now. Le Pigeon/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Le Pigeon/Courtesy of the artist

Elisapie Revisits Her Inuit Roots In 'The Ballad Of The Runaway Girl'

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Una Elisapie
Hajnal Venetian Snares

Female mosquitoes searching for a meal of blood detect people partly by using a special olfactory receptor to home in on our sweat. Luis Robayo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Luis Robayo/AFP/Getty Images

How Mosquitoes Sniff Out Human Sweat To Find Us

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Ay, Ay, Ay Dzihan & Kamien
Come Back Later Mako
Stimpak Sun Electric
Lay All Your Love On Me ABBA
U Give Me Lovebirds
Adore I:Cube
Try Me J Boogie's Dubtronic Science

Milicent Patrick poses in the Universal Studios monster shop with her most famous creation: the Creature from the Black Lagoon. Family collection/Courtesy of Hanover Square Press hide caption

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Family collection/Courtesy of Hanover Square Press

The Forgotten Woman Who Designed The Creature From The Black Lagoon

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Creature from the Black Lagoon Hans J. Salter
The Sun Windy & Carl

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