All Things Considered for May 31, 2019 Hear the All Things Considered program for May 31, 2019

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Shelly and Sam Summers stand with daughter Gabby in front of a makeshift shelter on their rural Bay County property. They opened their backyard to people who were homeless after Hurricane Michael. At the peak, about 50 people lived there. Now, there are 18. "We still have our home," Shelly says. "They have nothing. So if we can at least offer them the comforts of home, it was worth it." William Widmer for NPR hide caption

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William Widmer for NPR

National

Nearly 8 Months After Hurricane Michael, Florida Panhandle Feels Left Behind

Floridians are still reeling from the Category 5 storm's effects. They've been waiting more than 230 days for Congress to pass a disaster relief bill. And the new hurricane season is about to begin.

Shelly and Sam Summers stand with daughter Gabby in front of a makeshift shelter on their rural Bay County property. They opened their backyard to people who were homeless after Hurricane Michael. At the peak, about 50 people lived there. Now, there are 18. "We still have our home," Shelly says. "They have nothing. So if we can at least offer them the comforts of home, it was worth it." William Widmer for NPR hide caption

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William Widmer for NPR

National

Nearly 8 Months After Hurricane Michael, Florida Panhandle Feels Left Behind

7 min

Nearly 8 Months After Hurricane Michael, Florida Panhandle Feels Left Behind

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Philosophy professor Abby Everett Jaques of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology created a class called Ethics of Technology to help future engineers and computer scientists understand the pitfalls of tech. Courtesy of Kim Martineau, MIT Quest for Intelligence hide caption

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Courtesy of Kim Martineau, MIT Quest for Intelligence

Solving The Tech Industry's Ethics Problem Could Start In The Classroom

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