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William Linares, a 5-year-old from Honduras, plays in an encampment where he is living near the international bridge in Matamoros, Mexico, on April 30. The boy is traveling with his mother, Suanny Gomez, and seeking asylum in the United States. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

National

As The Line Into America Slows, Communities Form, And Wait, On The Mexican Side

U.S. border officials strictly limit the number of asylum seekers they allow to legally cross ports of entry every day, creating an enormous backlog of migrants in places like Matamoros.

William Linares, a 5-year-old from Honduras, plays in an encampment where he is living near the international bridge in Matamoros, Mexico, on April 30. The boy is traveling with his mother, Suanny Gomez, and seeking asylum in the United States. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

As The Line Into America Slows, Communities Form, And Wait, On The Mexican Side

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This illustration taken in April 2018 shows the logo of the iTunes app of Apple displayed on a tablet screen in Paris. Lionel Bonaventure/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Lionel Bonaventure/AFP/Getty Images

Music News

Remembering iTunes' Cultural Significance

3 min

Remembering iTunes' Cultural Significance

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A California two-spot octopus extends a sucker-lined arm from its den. In 2015, this was the first octopus species to have its full genetic sequence published. Courtesy of Michael LaBarbera hide caption

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Courtesy of Michael LaBarbera

Shots - Health News

Why Octopuses Might Be The Next Lab Rats

4 min

Why Octopuses Might Be The Next Lab Rats

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A Falcon 9 rocket carried 60 satellites for SpaceX's Starlink broadband network into space last month. John Raoux/AP hide caption

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John Raoux/AP

Astronomers Worry That Elon Musk's New Satellites Will Ruin The View

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The genetic variation Chinese scientist He Jiankui was trying to re-create when he edited twin girls' DNA may be more harmful than helpful to health overall, a new study says. Anthony Kwan/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Anthony Kwan/Bloomberg/Getty Images

2 Chinese Babies With Edited Genes May Face Higher Risk Of Premature Death

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"I was very influenced to sing more in Arabic and to express my Sudanese identity much more confrontationally and much more honestly," Ahmed Gallab of Sinkane says. Daniel Dorsa/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Daniel Dorsa/Courtesy of the artist

Music Interviews

Sinkane Harnesses Hope For Sudan In 'Dépaysé' Album

7 min

Sinkane Harnesses Hope For Sudan In 'Dépaysé' Album

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