All Things Considered for June 7, 2019 Hear the All Things Considered program for June 7, 2019

All Things Considered

Elliot Ackerman is also the author of the novels Dark at the Crossing and Waiting for Eden. He's pictured above during a TV taping in Milan in March 2016. Antonio Calanni/AP hide caption

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Antonio Calanni/AP

Author Interviews

'I Write To Understand What I Think': A Veteran Turns To Words After War

Elliot Ackerman served five tours in Iraq and Afghanistan. He sees the ongoing conflicts in the Middle East as "all one war" and explains why that's particularly tough on his generation of veterans.

Professor Longhair plays at the 1971 New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival. John Messina/Courtesy of Smithsonian Folkways hide caption

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John Messina/Courtesy of Smithsonian Folkways

Smithsonian Folkways Celebrates 50 Years Of Jazz Fest's Serendipity

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Elliot Ackerman is also the author of the novels Dark at the Crossing and Waiting for Eden. He's pictured above during a TV taping in Milan in March 2016. Antonio Calanni/AP hide caption

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Antonio Calanni/AP

'I Write To Understand What I Think': A Veteran Turns To Words After War

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Sara Fitzgerald and Michael Martin, both with the group One Virginia, protest gerrymandering in front of the Supreme Court in March 2018. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Redistricting Guru's Hard Drives Could Mean Legal, Political Woes For GOP

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The Last Black Man in San Francisco stars Jonathan Majors (left) and Jimmie Fails as best friends trying to reclaim Fails' childhood home. Peter Prato/A24 hide caption

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Peter Prato/A24

'The Last Black Man In San Francisco' Is About Who Belongs In A Beloved City

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All Things Considered