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A naturalization ceremony of new U.S. citizens at the Hylton Performing Arts Center in Manassas, Virginia. The U.S. citizenship oath today is 140 words. It wasn't until 1929 that the oath's text was standardized, and the oath was amended in 1952 to emphasize service to country as the U.S. faced a growing threat from the Soviet Union. Shuran Huang/NPR hide caption

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Shuran Huang/NPR

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How The U.S. Citizenship Oath Came To Be What It Is Today

If you are born in the United States, citizenship is a birthright. But if you immigrate to this country, the work of the citizenship process culminates in the reciting of an oath.

A naturalization ceremony of new U.S. citizens at the Hylton Performing Arts Center in Manassas, Virginia. The U.S. citizenship oath today is 140 words. It wasn't until 1929 that the oath's text was standardized, and the oath was amended in 1952 to emphasize service to country as the U.S. faced a growing threat from the Soviet Union. Shuran Huang/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Shuran Huang/NPR

How The U.S. Citizenship Oath Came To Be What It Is Today

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