All Things Considered for August 26, 2019 Hear the All Things Considered program for August 26, 2019

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Judge Thad Balkman ruled that Johnson & Johnson is responsible for fueling Oklahoma's opioid crisis. He announced his decision in Norman, Okla., Monday. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Sue Ogrocki/AP

Shots - Health News

Judge In Opioid Trial Rules Johnson & Johnson Must Pay Oklahoma $572 Million

In a landmark ruling, Judge Thad Balkman ruled in favor of Oklahoma in its lawsuit to hold the drugmaker accountable for the costs of opioid addiction in the state.

U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer (center left) shakes hands with Chinese Vice Premier Liu He at a conference center in Shanghai on July 31. Trade talks are expected to resume in September. Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

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Ng Han Guan/AP

China's Leaders Are Divided Over Trade War With U.S.

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Tidal Imogen Heap
Etchasketch Trees Ernest Gonzales

Members of the 146-voice chorus, dressed as garment workers, in composer Julia Wolfe's Fire In My Mouth, which documents the 1911 Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire in New York. Chris Lee/Decca Gold hide caption

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Chris Lee/Decca Gold

Tragic Fire Sparks Julia Wolfe's Latest Look At American Labor History

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Fire Julia Wolfe
Manic Monday Bangles

Laborers in the sugar cane fields of Central America are experiencing a rapid and unexplained form of kidney failure. Above: Harvesting sugar cane in Chichigalpa, Nicaragua. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Jason Beaubien/NPR

Whatever Happened To ... The Mysterious Kidney Disease Striking Central America?

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Alone In Kyoto Air

Clifton Heights Inn was once a Methodist Church and many of the guests who pass through are former congregants. Some have hosted weddings and anniversaries at the church turned inn. Shahla Farzan/St. Louis Public Radio hide caption

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Shahla Farzan/St. Louis Public Radio

Houses Of Worship Find New Life After Congregations Downsize

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Yellow Noise Spiro
Disco Kid Chaz Bundick Meets The Mattson 2
Explore, Be Curious Cloudkicker
We Will Rock You Queen

Judge Thad Balkman ruled that Johnson & Johnson is responsible for fueling Oklahoma's opioid crisis. He announced his decision in Norman, Okla., Monday. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Sue Ogrocki/AP

Johnson & Johnson Ordered To Pay Oklahoma $572 Million In Opioid Trial

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State's attorney Brad Beckworth lays out one of his closing arguments in Oklahoma's case against drugmaker Johnson & Johnson at the Cleveland County Courthouse in Norman, Okla. in July. The judge in the case ruled Monday that J&J must pay $572 million to the state. Chris Landsberger/AP hide caption

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Chris Landsberger/AP

Oklahoma Wanted $17 Billion To Fight Its Opioid Crisis: What's The Real Cost?

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Cascade Ryan Helsing
Phyllis Lettuce

The director of the National Security Agency, Gen. Paul Nakasone, often speaks about "persistent engagement" as a way to keep up pressure on adversaries in cyberspace. Since he took over last year, the spy agency has been pursuing a more assertive approach. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

'Persistent Engagement': The Phrase Driving A More Assertive U.S. Spy Agency

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Insight I Julien Marchal
Boys of Summer Don Henley
Siesta Empresarios
Never Mess With Sunday Yppah
Sin the Moon Shark Quest
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