All Things Considered for February 6, 2020 Hear the All Things Considered program for February 6, 2020

All Things Considered

A sign alerts customers that cash is not accepted at a shop in San Francisco last year. The city subsequently banned businesses from rejecting cash. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

Business

Some Businesses Are Going Cashless, But Cities Are Pushing Back

Washington, D.C., is the latest city to consider banning businesses from rejecting cash. Opponents of cashless stores say they discriminate against low-income, homeless and undocumented people.

A sign alerts customers that cash is not accepted at a shop in San Francisco last year. The city subsequently banned businesses from rejecting cash. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

Cities And States Are Saying No To Cashless Shops

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Barnes & Noble has canceled its Black History Month plans to re-release classic novels with cover art depicting characters as people of color, following online criticism. TBWIA\Chiat\Day hide caption

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TBWIA\Chiat\Day

Author L.L. McKinney: Barnes & Noble 'Diverse Editions' Are 'Literary Blackface'

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After working on film scores and collaborating with the New York City Ballet and the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, Dan Deacon released Mystic Familiar, his first solo album in five years. Frank Hamilton/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Frank Hamilton/Courtesy of the artist

Inside The Controlled Chaos Of Dan Deacon's 'Mystic Familiar'

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Methuselah, the first date palm tree grown from ancient seeds, in a photo taken in 2008. Guy Eisner hide caption

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Guy Eisner

Dates Like Jesus Ate? Scientists Revive Ancient Trees From 2,000-Year-Old Seeds

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