All Things Considered for April 10, 2020 Hear the All Things Considered program for April 10, 2020

All Things Considered

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Coronavirus Live Updates

Internal Emails Show VA Hospitals Are Rationing Protective Gear

Seven Veterans Affairs staffers have died from the virus, and unions for VA workers have been sounding the alarm about shortages of protective gear and insufficient staffing.

One year after his death, fans of Nipsey Hussle are honoring the rapper's legacy by turning his motivational words into actions. Prince Williams/WireImage hide caption

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Prince Williams/WireImage

'10 Toes Down': How Fans Carry On Nipsey Hussle's Legacy One Year After His Death

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April 15 will mark the first anniversary of the 2019 fire in Notre Dame cathedral. A small service will be livestreamed on Good Friday. Stephane Cardinale/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Stephane Cardinale/Corbis via Getty Images

Nearing Anniversary Of Devastating Fire, Notre Dame To Host A Good Friday Service

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The Indiana Historical Society in Indianapolis is asking the public to submit videos, photos, recordings, art or writing that will help tell the story of the pandemic. Indiana Historical Society hide caption

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Indiana Historical Society

Indiana Historical Society Begins Building A Coronavirus Collection

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Seattle musician Begin Nora has lost all her income in the coronavirus pandemic. With three teenagers to feed, she and her husband are eager to get the emergency government money. Courtesy of Sonja Scarseth hide caption

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Courtesy of Sonja Scarseth

How To Get Your $1,200 Emergency Payment Faster — But Watch Out For Debt Collectors

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