All Things Considered for July 22, 2020 Hear the All Things Considered program for July 22, 2020

All Things Considered

In recent weeks, U.S.-China relations have unraveled with alarming speed, and some analysts say they are now at their worst since the two countries normalized diplomatic ties in 1979. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

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Andy Wong/AP

World

Timeline: The Unraveling Of U.S.-China Relations

On Tuesday, the Trump administration ordered China's Houston consulate to close, amping up tensions in already fraught relations. Here are some of the key developments reshaping U.S.-China relations.

In recent weeks, U.S.-China relations have unraveled with alarming speed, and some analysts say they are now at their worst since the two countries normalized diplomatic ties in 1979. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

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Andy Wong/AP

Timeline: The Unraveling Of U.S.-China Relations

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You The Dining Rooms
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Above Blue Man Group
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Beautiful Robots (Ambient Reprise) John Beltran
Think About Things Dadi Freyr Petursson
It is What It Is Blood Orange

Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner speaks at free COVID-19 testing provided by United Memorial Medical Center at the Mexican Consulate Sunday, June 28 in Houston. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

Houston's COVID-19 Cases Level Off After Sudden Surge In Late June

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You Petit Biscuit
Comeback Kid The Midnight
Sonate Pacifique L'Impératrice
Inhaler Hooverphonic
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An evacuee lies on a cot at an evacuation shelter for people with disabilities in Stuart, Fla., in preparation for Hurricane Dorian on Sept. 1, 2019. Now, with the pandemic raging, officials across the South are trying to adjust their evacuation and shelter plans. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Gerald Herbert/AP

Disaster Relief For The Elderly And Disabled Is Already Hard. Now Add A Pandemic

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Spooky Couch Albert Hammond, Jr.
Green Hill Zone Jon Batiste

Izzy Benasso injured her knee while playing tennis with her father Steve Benasso in Denver. After the college student had knee surgery to repair the injury, her dad noticed her medical bills included a separate one from a surgical assistant for $1,167. Rachel Woolf for KHN hide caption

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Rachel Woolf for KHN

The Knee Surgeon Was In-Network. The Surgical Assistant Wasn't, And Billed $1,167

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The Robots Kraftwerk
I Hope You Die Wye Oak

Police Chief Carmen Best listens during a news conference at City Hall in Seattle on July 13. Best is critical of a plan backed by several city council members that seeks to cut the police department's budget in half. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Seattle Police Chief On Proposed Budget Cuts And Calls For Reforms

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Do It
Western Black Midi
Révélation College

Idaho Gov. Brad Little speaks at a news conference in Boise on March 13. Less than four months after the state confirmed its first case of the coronavirus, it has emerged as one of the nation's biggest hot spots. Keith Ridler/AP hide caption

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Keith Ridler/AP

In Idaho, One Of The Last States Hit By The Coronavirus, Cases Are Now Surging

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Swayed Kiasmos
Eyes Be Closed Washed Out

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