All Things Considered for July 28, 2020 Hear the All Things Considered program for July 28, 2020

All Things Considered

Amazon's Jeff Bezos, Apple's Tim Cook, Google's Sundar Pichai and Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg will face congressional questioning about whether tech has too much power. Pablo Martinez Monsivais, Evan Vucci, Jeff Chiu, Jens Meyer/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais, Evan Vucci, Jeff Chiu, Jens Meyer/AP

Technology

Big Tech In Washington's Hot Seat: What You Need To Know

The heads of Facebook, Google, Amazon and Apple will face lawmakers' questions about whether they are using their power to squash competition.

"People are not very good with large numbers," says Elke Weber, a professor of psychology at Princeton University. "We don't discriminate between 150,000 or 300,000 or 3 million." Malte Mueller/Getty Images/fStop hide caption

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Malte Mueller/Getty Images/fStop

Why We Grow Numb To Staggering Statistics — And What We Can Do About It

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Seven Planetary Heavens The Comet Is Coming
Pretty Stars Bill Frisell

Protesters hold signs at a rally supporting the Supreme Court's ruling to uphold the DACA program on June 18. The Trump administration on Tuesday moved to continue its rollback of the program, despite court rulings. Sandy Huffaker/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sandy Huffaker/AFP via Getty Images

Trump Administration Refuses To Accept New DACA Applicants Despite Court Rulings

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Midnight on the Run Boombox
Dandelion Wine Gregory Alan Isakov
Blue Eyed Bitter Aeroc
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Your Hand in Mine (Goodbye) Explosions in the Sky
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Maria Sherman's new book gives critical consideration to a too-often maligned phenomenon within pop music: the boy band. Alex Fine/Courtesy of Black Dog & Leventhal hide caption

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Alex Fine/Courtesy of Black Dog & Leventhal

A New Book Traces The History Of Boy Bands, The Pop Phenomenon 'Larger Than Life'

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Bye Bye Love Backstreet Boys
Billy & Bess Theme The NCY Milky Band

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms, seen here in 2018, has called for mandatory mask wearing in her city. Paras Griffin/Getty Images for Essence hide caption

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Paras Griffin/Getty Images for Essence

Atlanta Mayor Defends Legal Face-Off With Georgia's Governor Over Masks

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The Safety of the Sleepy Moonlight Those Who Ride With Giants
Dreamflower Tarika Blue
Fjarlaegur Oskar Schuster
Young Vallis Alps

Amazon's Jeff Bezos, Apple's Tim Cook, Google's Sundar Pichai and Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg will face congressional questioning about whether tech has too much power. Pablo Martinez Monsivais, Evan Vucci, Jeff Chiu, Jens Meyer/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais, Evan Vucci, Jeff Chiu, Jens Meyer/AP

Big Tech In Washington's Hot Seat: What You Need To Know

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Life's What You Make It Daphni
Better Give U Up FKJ
America 2 The Midnight

When it comes to the climate change, "you can see these vast changes in the future, and you can be worried about them, but you can still continue to do good and work in the moment for small things," says Zach St. George. Above, a sequoia in California's Giant Sequoia National Monument in July 2002. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

Believe It Or Not, Forests Migrate — But Not Fast Enough For Climate Change

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Pretending Evolution of Stars
Reverie Ramin Djawadi

All Things Considered