All Things Considered for September 1, 2020 Hear the All Things Considered program for September 1, 2020

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An aerial view of Lake Charles, La., shows damage to houses last week after Hurricane Laura, one of the most powerful storms ever to hit Louisiana, tore through the area. Bryan Tarnowski/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bryan Tarnowski/Bloomberg via Getty Images

National

Amid National Crises, Louisiana Mayor Fears His Decimated City Will Be Forgotten

Most buildings in Lake Charles, La., were damaged by Hurricane Laura. As the city tries to rebuild amid a global pandemic, Mayor Nic Hunter worries the country will look away.

Wisconsin Lt. Gov. Mandela Barnes speaks during a news conference last week in Kenosha, Wis. Morry Gash/AP hide caption

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Morry Gash/AP

Wisconsin Lt. Gov. Mandela Barnes: Trump Will Use Every Opportunity To Divide People

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An aerial view of Lake Charles, La., shows damage to houses last week after Hurricane Laura, one of the most powerful storms ever to hit Louisiana, tore through the area. Bryan Tarnowski/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bryan Tarnowski/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Amid National Crises, Louisiana Mayor Fears His Decimated City Will Be Forgotten

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Empty offices sit above empty retail stores on Broadway in downtown Manhattan. As commercial real estate continues to lie vacant around the U.S., it may contribute to a vicious economic cycle that reshapes our cities. Ryan Kailath for NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kailath for NPR

'Do I Really Need This Much Office Space?' Pandemic Emptied Buildings, But How Long?

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Danielle Long, 12, is one of hundreds of kids who were able to show their animals at a revamped version of the Mesa County Fair in western Colorado. She said she was happy to be there with Rocco, her lamb, but she knew it would be hard to see him auctioned off. Stina Sieg/CPR News hide caption

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Stina Sieg/CPR News

For Colorado 4-H Kids, The Livestock Show Goes On Despite The Pandemic

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