All Things Considered for October 22, 2020 Hear the All Things Considered program for October 22, 2020

All Things Considered

Eric Parker of the Real 3%ers Idaho attends a convoy training exercise in western Idaho on Jan. 25. NPR has followed Parker's political evolution as he joins a wave of "patriot movement" figures seeking – and sometimes winning – public office. Jim Urquhart for NPR hide caption

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Jim Urquhart for NPR

National

Militia Leader Known As The 'Bundy Ranch Sniper' Seeks A New Title: State Senator

The election season's spotlight on the militia threat is glaring for Eric Parker. Federal authorities consider him a domestic extremist. That hasn't stopped his run for the Idaho Legislature.

Students attend the first day of school in the small town of Labastida, Spain, on Sept. 8. A recent study found no link between coronavirus spikes and school reopenings in the country. Alvaro Barrientos/AP hide caption

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Alvaro Barrientos/AP

The Coronavirus Crisis

Are The Risks Of Reopening Schools Exaggerated?

3 min

Are The Risks Of Reopening Schools Exaggerated?

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The remnants of Hurricane Sandy churn up Lake Michigan in Chicago in 2012. Flood risk in the city is increasing as climate change drives more extreme rain, and renters face greater financial peril than homeowners. More than half of Chicagoans are renters, according to 2019 census data. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Climate Risk Hits Home

Most Tenants Get No Information About Flooding. It Can Cost Them Dearly

3 min

Most Tenants Get No Information About Flooding. It Can Cost Them Dearly

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Left: Luminalt employee Pam Quan installs solar panels on the roof of a home in San Francisco in 2018. Right: An oilfield worker fills his truck with water before heading to a drilling site in the Permian Basin oil field in Andrews, Texas, in 2016. Justin Sullivan and Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan and Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Oil Jobs Are Big Risk, Big Pay. Green Energy Offers Stability And Passion

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Sales of previously owned homes jumped more than 20% in September from a year earlier, but sales of homes costing more than $1 million more than doubled. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Coronavirus Updates

Housing Boom: Sales of Million-Dollar Homes Double

2 min

Housing Boom: Sales of Million-Dollar Homes Double

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Eric Parker of the Real 3%ers Idaho attends a convoy training exercise in western Idaho on Jan. 25. NPR has followed Parker's political evolution as he joins a wave of "patriot movement" figures seeking – and sometimes winning – public office. Jim Urquhart for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jim Urquhart for NPR

Militia Leader Known As The 'Bundy Ranch Sniper' Seeks A New Title: State Senator

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All Things Considered