All Things Considered for March 10, 2021 Hear the All Things Considered program for March 10, 2021

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White House coordinator for the Southern Border Ambassador Roberta Jacobson outlined a plan to provide $4 billion in relief to Central America and tamp down corruption amid a fresh surge in migration. She stressed, in English and Spanish, "The border is not open." Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Politics

'The Border Is Not Open': Biden Administration Seeks Foreign Aid To Slow Migration

The White House asks Congress for $4 billion in aid for countries in Central America to address root causes of illegal migration, as the number of border crossings into the U.S. spikes.

Faith groups are deeply split over the Equality Act. Evangelicals, Catholics, Latter-day Saints and Orthodox Jews say it limits religious freedom. Mainline Protestants and other progressive faith groups support it. Jessica Rinaldi/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Jessica Rinaldi/Boston Globe via Getty Images

Some Faith Leaders Call Equality Act Devastating; For Others, It's God's Will

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Alone In Kyoto Air
Jill Pole [Instrumental] Belle and Sebastian
Terraform Mutual Benefit
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Terraform
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The Space Project
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Mutual Benefit

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We Were Never Glorious Belle and Sebastian

Sheila Tyson, a Jefferson County commissioner in Birmingham, Ala., is fighting to get more doses of COVID-19 vaccines into communities of color in her state. Andi Rice/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andi Rice/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Alabama Official On Vaccine Rollout: 'How Can This Disparity Exist In This Country?'

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Ikebana Kevin Shields
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Ikebana
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Lost In Translation
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Kevin Shields

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Alaska (Sofi Tukker remix) Maggie Rogers
One Million of Years
Your Girl Blue States
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Your Girl
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Nothing Changes Under The Sun
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Blue States

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Selector Mark Ronson and the Business Intl

White House coordinator for the Southern Border Ambassador Roberta Jacobson outlined a plan to provide $4 billion in relief to Central America and tamp down corruption amid a fresh surge in migration. She stressed, in English and Spanish, "The border is not open." Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

'The Border Is Not Open': Biden Administration Seeks Foreign Aid To Slow Migration

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A pedestrian on Feb. 25 walks past the window of a restaurant with a sign promoting its re-opening in Boulder, Colo. Congress on Wednesday passed a $1.9 trillion stimulus plan, which is expected to provide a strong boost to economic growth. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

Biden's $1.9 Trillion Rescue Plan Set To Turbocharge U.S. Economy

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Almost Home Trent Reznor & Atticus Ross
Blue ---- Mica Levi
Navy & Cream U.S. Girls
Nobody's Empire Belle & Sebastian

Early on in the COVID-19 pandemic antibiotics were frequently prescribed to seriously ill patients, even though the disease is caused by a virus. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Antibiotic Use Ran High In Early Days Of COVID-19, Despite Viral Cause

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Aurora Aydio

Less than a year after the Trump administration enacted new rules for how schools handle cases of sexual assault and harassment, President Biden is beginning the process to replace those. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Biden Begins Process To Undo Trump Administration's Title IX Rules

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Barcelona Axel Boman
Sister Buddha (Intro) [Instrumental] Belle and Sebastian
Black Car Beach House
Missing Words Mark Ronson and the Business Intl

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