All Things Considered for March 22, 2021 Hear the All Things Considered program for March 22, 2021

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Residents of the District of Columbia rally for statehood Monday near the U.S. Capitol ahead of a House committee hearing on the effort. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Politics

With Stronger Democratic Support, D.C. Statehood Fight Returns To Capitol Hill

The measure is expected to pass the House but faces long odds in the Senate, leading some advocates to call for the end of the legislative filibuster.

Residents of the District of Columbia rally for statehood Monday near the U.S. Capitol ahead of a House committee hearing on the effort. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

With Stronger Democratic Support, D.C. Statehood Fight Returns To Capitol Hill

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Even after brutal reviews for the short-lived Anyone Can Whistle, Stephen Sondheim continued to create provocative and form-shattering musicals. Stephen Lovekin/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Lovekin/Getty Images

A Cult-Classic Sondheim Flop Gets An Essential New Recording

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A U.S. satellite captures cloud cover over North America on Monday. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced it has upgraded its weather forecasting model to use more satellite weather data. GOES-East CONUS/NOAA/NASA hide caption

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GOES-East CONUS/NOAA/NASA

NOAA Upgrades Forecasts As Climate Change Drives More Severe Storms

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Lady Mary Wortley Montagu learned of a way to stop smallpox from women in the Ottoman Empire in the early 18th century. Trying to persuade her country to do the same proved tricky. Sepia Times/Universal Images Group via Getty hide caption

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Sepia Times/Universal Images Group via Getty

A 300-Year-Old Tale Of One Woman's Quest To Stop A Deadly Virus

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