All Things Considered for October 13, 2021 Hear the All Things Considered program for October 13, 2021

All Things Considered

Restaurant food and packaged foods are often high in salt to make them more palatable. The Food and Drug Administration wants to see the food industry gradually reduce sodium levels in these foods. Eric Savage/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Savage/Getty Images

Shots - Health News

Eating too much salt is making Americans sick. Even a 12% reduction can save lives

The FDA has issued new targets to reduce the amount of salt that manufacturers put in their foods. It could prevent thousands of cases of cardiovascular disease.

Restaurant food and packaged foods are often high in salt to make them more palatable. The Food and Drug Administration wants to see the food industry gradually reduce sodium levels in these foods. Eric Savage/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Savage/Getty Images

Eating too much salt is making Americans sick. Even a 12% reduction can save lives

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1045651839/1045747034" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A study by the National Institutes of Health this week suggests people who got the J&J vaccine as their initial vaccination against the coronavirus may get their best protection from choosing an mRNA vaccine as the booster. Francine Orr/Los Angeles Times/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Francine Orr/Los Angeles Times/Getty Images

A study of COVID vaccine boosters suggests Moderna or Pfizer works best

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1045485935/1045747534" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Demonstrators march during a protest against Asian hate in Times Square in New York in March after a troubling spike in violence against the Asian American community during the coronavirus pandemic. Michael Nagle/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Nagle/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images

With racial attacks on the rise, Asian Americans fear for their safety

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1045746655/1045746656" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The National Museum of African American Music, in Nashville. NMAAM/353 Media Group hide caption

toggle caption
NMAAM/353 Media Group

A new museum in Nashville centers the artistry of Black musicians

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1016619682/1045746703" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Searching for a song you heard between stories? We've retired music buttons on these pages. Learn more here.

All Things Considered