All Things Considered for October 28, 2021 Hear the All Things Considered program for October 28, 2021

All Things Considered

A sign asking patrons to wear a mask is seen at the entrance of a restaurant in New York City on Aug. 3. The spread of the delta variant led to sharply slower economic growth in the July-to-September quarter. Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images

The Coronavirus Crisis

How the economy went from sizzle to fizzle, and why there's hope for a way back

The U.S. economy slowed sharply in the third quarter as the delta variant and persistent supply chain woes weighed on growth. The months ahead should be better.

Almost a third of the diesel fuel sold in California now is derived from biological feedstocks like plant oils. Environmental incentives make this "renewable diesel" more profitable. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Biodiesel is booming. It may help the climate, but there's a big environmental risk

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A sign asking patrons to wear a mask is seen at the entrance of a restaurant in New York City on Aug. 3. The spread of the delta variant led to sharply slower economic growth in the July-to-September quarter. Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images

How the economy went from sizzle to fizzle, and why there's hope for a way back

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A truck hauls a piece of John Deere equipment from the factory past workers picketing outside the John Deere Davenport Works facility on Oct. 15 in Davenport, Iowa. More than 10,000 John Deere employees, represented by the UAW, walked off the job in mid-October after failing to agree to the terms of a new contract. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

3 reasons labor strikes are surging right now — and why they could continue to grow

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All Things Considered