All Things Considered for November 10, 2021 Hear the All Things Considered program for November 10, 2021

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Rioters take to the steps of the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. An NPR analysis found more Capitol riot defendants may have ties to the Oath Keepers, a far-right group, than was previously known. Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Investigations

Capitol riot suspects had more ties to Oath Keepers than previously known

NPR has identified previously undisclosed connections between the far-right anti-government group the Oath Keepers and defendants charged in connection with the Jan. 6 Capitol riot.

A Rivian electric truck is displayed near the Nasdaq MarketSite building in Times Square in New York City on Nov. 10. Rivian, an electric-truck maker backed by Amazon and Ford, made its debut on Nasdaq in one of the biggest initial public offerings in U.S. history. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

The electric automaker Rivian soared in its stock debut. Why there's so much buzz

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Rioters take to the steps of the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. An NPR analysis found more Capitol riot defendants may have ties to the Oath Keepers, a far-right group, than was previously known. Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Capitol riot suspects had more ties to Oath Keepers than previously known

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Brianna Fruean, a Samoan member of the Pacific Climate Warriors, speaks at the COP26 climate summit in Glasgow, Scotland, on Tuesday. Ian Forsyth/Getty Images hide caption

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Ian Forsyth/Getty Images

For Brianna Fruean, the smell of mud drives home the need for climate action

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All Things Considered