All Things Considered for November 12, 2021 Hear the All Things Considered program for November 12, 2021

All Things Considered

A United States Border Patrol agent on horseback tries to stop a Haitian migrant from entering an encampment on the banks of the Rio Grande near the Acuna Del Rio International Bridge in Del Rio, Texas on Sept. 19, 2021. Paul Ratje/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Ratje/AFP via Getty Images

National

The inquiry into border agents on horseback continues. Critics see a 'broken' system

Six weeks ago, DHS promised a quick investigation into images of Border Patrol agents on horses menacing Haitian migrants at the border. Critics say the discipline system needs an overhaul.

The chained hand of Archer Alexander, who was the last slave captured under the fugitive slave law, is depicted in a statue commemorating the Emancipation Proclamation. A bill to study reparations for slavery advanced through a House committee this year but hasn't gotten a floor vote. Karen Bleier/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Karen Bleier/AFP via Getty Images

A bill to study reparations for slavery had momentum in Congress, but still no vote

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Pro-democracy activists (right) hold placards with the picture of Chinese citizen journalist Zhang Zhan as they march to the Chinese central government's liaison office in Hong Kong in Dec. 2020. Kin Cheung/AP hide caption

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Kin Cheung/AP

A citizen journalist who shined a light on the pandemic in Wuhan may die in prison

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A United States Border Patrol agent on horseback tries to stop a Haitian migrant from entering an encampment on the banks of the Rio Grande near the Acuna Del Rio International Bridge in Del Rio, Texas on Sept. 19, 2021. Paul Ratje/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Ratje/AFP via Getty Images

The inquiry into border agents on horseback continues. Critics see a 'broken' system

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The ringed antpipit (corythopis torquatus) was among the 77 species examined in the recent study. Majority World/Universal Images Group via Getty hide caption

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Majority World/Universal Images Group via Getty

Amazon birds are shrinking as the climate warms, prompting warning from scientists

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English electronica musician and producer Jon Hopkins. His new album, Music For Psychedelic Therapy, is out now. Kevin Lake/Future Music Magazine hide caption

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Kevin Lake/Future Music Magazine

Jon Hopkins found his beatless new album, 'Music for Psychedelic Therapy,' deep down

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