All Things Considered for November 29, 2021 Hear the All Things Considered program for November 29, 2021

All Things Considered

The future of abortion, always a contentious issue, is up at the Supreme Court on Dec. 1. Arguments are planned challenging Roe v. Wade and Planned Parenthood v. Casey, the court's major decisions over the last half-century that guarantee a woman's right to an abortion nationwide. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption
J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Law

As the Supreme Court considers Roe v. Wade, a look at how abortion became legal

Abortion did not become illegal in most states until the mid to late 1800s. But by the 1960s, abortion, like childbirth, had become a safe procedure when performed by a doctor.

The future of abortion, always a contentious issue, is up at the Supreme Court on Dec. 1. Arguments are planned challenging Roe v. Wade and Planned Parenthood v. Casey, the court's major decisions over the last half-century that guarantee a woman's right to an abortion nationwide. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption
J. Scott Applewhite/AP

As the Supreme Court considers Roe v. Wade, a look at how abortion became legal

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1056129045/1059861869" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

People shop in The Galleria mall during on Black Friday in Houston, Texas. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Why Americans buy so much stuff: A short history

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1059861668/1059861688" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Rep. Stephanie Murphy, D-Fla., leader of a group of centrist Democrats, backed the domestic spending bill that the House approved last week but says internal fights complicated the effort to get the message out on the measure's components. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Democrats go on the offense with Biden's agenda to avoid a repeat of Obamacare battle

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1058160233/1059861875" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jack Dorsey is stepping down as the CEO of Twitter, which he co-founded. Here he's shown at a bitcoin convention in June. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Jack Dorsey steps down as Twitter CEO; Parag Agrawal succeeds him

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1059756077/1059861881" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Searching for a song you heard between stories? We've retired music buttons on these pages. Learn more here.

All Things Considered