All Things Considered for December 13, 2021 Hear the All Things Considered program for December 13, 2021

All Things Considered

Then-White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows speaks with reporters outside the White House on Oct. 26, 2020. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Politics

Jan. 6 panel votes to hold Meadows in contempt, sending a criminal referral to House

Ahead of the vote, Republican Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming read a litany of text messages she said Mark Meadows received during the Jan. 6 siege, including from Donald Trump Jr.

Then-White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows speaks with reporters outside the White House on Oct. 26, 2020. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Jan. 6 panel votes to hold Meadows in contempt, sending a criminal referral to House

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Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks with President Biden about the tensions over Ukraine via a videoconference on Dec. 7. Russia has massed some 100,000 troops near its border with Ukraine. As Russia's leader, Putin has sent Russian forces on multiple combat missions, including a 2014 invasion of Ukraine. Mikhail Metzel/AP hide caption

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Mikhail Metzel/AP

In times of crisis — or to create one — Russia's Putin turns to his military

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Randy Malcom, from left, Alexander Delgado of Gente De Zona and Yotuel sing Patria y Vida at the Latin Grammy Awards on Nov. 18, 2021, in Las Vegas. Chris Pizzello/Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP hide caption

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Chris Pizzello/Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

Latin Grammy winner to Cuban leaders: 'We're done with your lies and indoctrination'

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Yalonda Chandler homeschools her children, Madison and Matthew. She co-founded Black Homeschoolers of Birmingham, in Alabama, and has seen the organization grow since the pandemic began. Kyra Miles/WBHM hide caption

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Kyra Miles/WBHM

More Black families are homeschooling their children, citing the pandemic and racism

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