All Things Considered for January 24, 2022 Hear the All Things Considered program for January 24, 2022

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The Supreme Court will hear arguments in the fall over the constitutionality of Harvard University's affirmative action program. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

Law

The Supreme Court adds affirmative action to its potential hit list

With the court already having heard arguments this term on abortion and guns, this case marks yet another politically charged issue that threatens to uproot decades of legal doctrine.

Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Thursday in New York City. Stocks continued to slump on Monday as the Federal Reserve gears up to raise interest rates in a bid to bring down inflation from 40-year highs. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Stocks are in the midst of a wild ride as the U.S. gets ready to fight inflation

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Author and Princeton Professor Imani Perry. Ecco hide caption

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Ecco

Author Interviews

Author Imani Perry explores the South to reveal the soul of America

7 min

Author Imani Perry explores the South to reveal the soul of America

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The Supreme Court will hear arguments in the fall over the constitutionality of Harvard University's affirmative action program. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

Law

The Supreme Court adds affirmative action to its potential hit list

4 min

The Supreme Court adds affirmative action to its potential hit list

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Dhaval Bhatt plays Monopoly with his children, Hridaya (left) and Martand, at their home in St. Peters, Missouri. Martand's mother took him to a children's hospital in April after he burned his hand, and the bill for the emergency room visit was more than $1,000 — even though the child was never seen by a doctor. Whitney Curtis for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Whitney Curtis for Kaiser Health News

The doctor didn't show up, but the hospital ER still billed $1,012

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Music

Like a 'Bat Out of Hell'

8 min

Like a 'Bat Out of Hell'

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