All Things Considered for February 8, 2022 Hear the All Things Considered program for February 8, 2022

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A boxing club in Pittsburgh offers classes for people with Parkinson's disease. Patients have been trying approaches like boxing or dancing because it seems to help them move more smoothly and quickly for a temporary period of time. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Shots - Health News

A brain circuit tied to emotion may lead to better treatments for Parkinson's disease

The symptoms of Parkinson's disease can vanish briefly in the face of stress or a strong emotion. Now scientists are searching for a treatment based on this phenomenon, a form of the placebo effect.

A boxing club in Pittsburgh offers classes for people with Parkinson's disease. Patients have been trying approaches like boxing or dancing because it seems to help them move more smoothly and quickly for a temporary period of time. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

A brain circuit tied to emotion may lead to better treatments for Parkinson's disease

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Russian President Vladimir Putin (left) hosts French President Emmanuel Macron at the Kremlin in Moscow on Monday. Putin and other Russian leaders have sought to portray Ukraine and NATO as the aggressor in the current crisis over Ukraine. The U.S. has gone public with what it calls Russian disinformation. AP hide caption

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AP

As Russia threatens Ukraine, the U.S. 'pre-bunks' Russian propaganda

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Engraved portrait of Abraham Galloway from William Still's The Underground Railroad, published in 1872. William Still's 'The Underground Railroad,' 1872 hide caption

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William Still's 'The Underground Railroad,' 1872

Abraham Galloway is the Black figure from the Civil War you should know about

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Contact tracing programs around the country have been struggling to keep up with demand during the last several coronavirus surges. Here, contact tracer Cherie Hunter works from her home in Tinley Park, Ill., to reach people who have tested positive for COVID-19. Antonio Perez/Chicago Tribune/Tribune News Service via Getty Image hide caption

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Antonio Perez/Chicago Tribune/Tribune News Service via Getty Image

If you tested positive and the contact tracer never called, here's why

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The Bitcoin logo is displayed on the screen of a Bitcoin ATM in Los Angeles. The Justice Department said a New York couple has been charged with conspiring to launder billions of dollars' worth of stolen bitcoin. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

DOJ arrests New York couple and seizes $3.6 billion in bitcoin related to 2016 hack

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Former New York Times editorial page editor James Bennet, shown here in a photo from 2017, said Tuesday he accepted blame for an editorial that falsely linked a graphic from former Gov. Sarah Palin's political action committee with a mass shooting in Arizona. He testified during Palin's defamation suit. Larry Neumeister/AP hide caption

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Larry Neumeister/AP

Former 'New York Times' editor testifies on Sarah Palin editorial: 'This is my fault'

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