All Things Considered for March 1, 2022 Hear the All Things Considered program for March 1, 2022

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A 2020 test of a ground-based intercontinental ballistic missile from the Plesetsk facility in northwestern Russia. Russia has the world's largest nuclear arsenal. Russian Defense Ministry Press Service /AP hide caption

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Russian Defense Ministry Press Service /AP

Ukraine invasion — explained

As Russia's Ukraine war intensifies, some warn nuclear escalation is possible

Russian President Vladimir Putin gave orders to his nation's nuclear forces over the weekend, but their exact meaning is unclear. Russia has more nuclear weapons than any other nation.

Nigerian students in Ukraine wait at the platform at the Lviv railway station on Sunday. Bernat Armangue/AP hide caption

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Bernat Armangue/AP

International students are facing challenges as they try to evacuate Ukraine

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A 2020 test of a ground-based intercontinental ballistic missile from the Plesetsk facility in northwestern Russia. Russia has the world's largest nuclear arsenal. Russian Defense Ministry Press Service /AP hide caption

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Russian Defense Ministry Press Service /AP

As Russia's Ukraine war intensifies, some warn nuclear escalation is possible

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Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds will give the official Republican response to President Biden's State of the Union address. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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Charlie Neibergall/AP

Iowa Gov. Reynolds will likely tout her COVID response in State of the Union rebuttal

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Mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato's new album, Eden, is a meditation on the natural world. Sergi Jasanada/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Sergi Jasanada/Courtesy of the artist

Joyce DiDonato's 'Eden' beckons humanity back to the garden

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