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The invasion of Ukraine has seen a surge of videos flooding TikTok, many of the most popular ones containing false or misleading material. Kiichiro Sato/AP hide caption

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Kiichiro Sato/AP

Technology

TikTok sees a surge of misleading videos that claim to show the invasion of Ukraine

A flurry of conflict-themed videos has inundated TikTok, sending countless videos depicting military action unrelated to the war in Ukraine to millions of viewers.

People walk along Wall Street near the New York Stock Exchange, in New York City. The stock market has been volatile as the war in Ukraine and high oil prices continues to worry investors. Americans' stress about global uncertainty is high, according to a new survey. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Americans' stress is spiking over inflation, war in Ukraine, survey finds

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A Census Bureau worker waits to gather information from people during a 2020 census promotional event in New York City. Brendan McDermid/Reuters hide caption

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Brendan McDermid/Reuters

The 2020 census had big undercounts of Black people, Latinos and Native Americans

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The invasion of Ukraine has seen a surge of videos flooding TikTok, many of the most popular ones containing false or misleading material. Kiichiro Sato/AP hide caption

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Kiichiro Sato/AP

TikTok sees a surge of misleading videos that claim to show the invasion of Ukraine

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Family members exchange photographs of their lost loved ones in the lobby of the Akin Gump law firm offices on Thursday in Manhattan, NY. The family members and victims gave statements to the U.S. Bankruptcy Court with the Sackler family, who own Purdue Pharma LP, present on Thursday. Desiree Rios for NPR hide caption

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Desiree Rios for NPR

For the first time, victims of the opioid crisis formally confront the Sackler family

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A sign shows the price of gas outside of a gas station in Washington, D.C, on March 8. Annual inflation is likely to have hit another 40-year high in February, yet the data won't fully capture the most recent surge in energy prices after Russia invaded Ukraine. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Inflation hits another 40-year high. The war in Ukraine could make it worse

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