All Things Considered for April 29, 2022 Hear the All Things Considered program for April 29, 2022

All Things Considered

Terrence Floyd speaks during a news conference during the unveiling of three sculptures as part of the "SEEINJUSTICE" art exhibition that feature the likenesses of his brother George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and John Lewis, Thursday, Sept. 30, 2021, at Union Square in the Manhattan borough of New York. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

toggle caption
John Minchillo/AP

America Reckons With Racial Injustice

9,000 digital art NFTs are being released to raise funds in George Floyd's memory

In the fight to get justice for his brother's murder, Terrence Floyd has turned to the unlikeliest corners to do just that: NFTs — or non-fungible tokens.

Christina Warren wears a MoviePass T-shirt, a piece of her collection of swag from dead companies. Christina Warren hide caption

toggle caption
Christina Warren

From CNN+ to Fyre Festival: This collector seeks swag from companies with epic ends

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1094889626/1095642563" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Director and actress Olivia Wilde examines an envelope reading "Personal and Confidential" while onstage during the CinemaCon convention in Las Vegas on April 26. A woman from the audience had slid the mysterious envelope toward her. It turns out she had been served with legal documents in an atypically public way. Greg Doherty/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Greg Doherty/Getty Images

Inside the world of process serving: Explaining what happened to Olivia Wilde

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1095415035/1095674633" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Rachel Levine, U.S. assistant secretary for health, says, "The language of medicine and science is being used to drive people to suicide." Political attacks against trans young people are on the rise across the country. Caroline Brehman-Pool/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Caroline Brehman-Pool/Getty Images

Rachel Levine calls state anti-LGBTQ bills disturbing and dangerous to trans youth

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1095227346/1095642569" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Terrence Floyd speaks during a news conference during the unveiling of three sculptures as part of the "SEEINJUSTICE" art exhibition that feature the likenesses of his brother George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and John Lewis, Thursday, Sept. 30, 2021, at Union Square in the Manhattan borough of New York. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

toggle caption
John Minchillo/AP

9,000 digital art NFTs are being released to raise funds in George Floyd's memory

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1091313995/1095642577" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Netflix logo is seen on top of their office building in Hollywood, Calif. The streaming service has laid off some employees of its companion website called Tudum. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

Netflix promised good jobs at Tudum. Now, one of its teams has been laid off

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1095642535/1095642536" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Searching for a song you heard between stories? We've retired music buttons on these pages. Learn more here.

All Things Considered