All Things Considered for June 15, 2022 Hear the All Things Considered program for June 15, 2022

All Things Considered

New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy speaks to reporters during a briefing in Trenton, N.J., on Feb. 7, 2022. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Seth Wenig/AP

Roe v. Wade and the future of reproductive rights in America

New Jersey touts abortion protections to lure businesses

Gov. Phil Murphy sent a letter to nearly 60 businesses suggesting they could expand into New Jersey because the state protects abortion rights.

Young women eat lunch in the Tuileries Garden in Paris in January 1929. Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images

Drop that fork! Why eating at your desk is banned in France

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1103463809/1105335978" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell looks on after taking the oath of office for his second term at the helm of the central bank at the Fed's headquarters in Washington, D.C., on May 23. The Fed raised interest rates by three-quarters of a percentage point on Wednesday. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

The Fed delivers biggest interest rate hike in decades to combat surging inflation

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1105026915/1105318218" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy speaks to reporters during a briefing in Trenton, N.J., on Feb. 7, 2022. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Seth Wenig/AP

New Jersey touts abortion protections to lure businesses

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1105101331/1105318224" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A child receives the Pfizer BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine at the Fairfax County Government Center in Annandale, Va., in November 2021. A committee of advisers to the Food and Drug Administration recommended Wednesday that the agency expand authorization of COVID-19 vaccines to children as young as 6-months-old. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Advisers to the FDA back COVID vaccines for the youngest children

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1105293813/1105318230" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Searching for a song you heard between stories? We've retired music buttons on these pages. Learn more here.

All Things Considered