All Things Considered for July 11, 2022 Hear the All Things Considered program for July 11, 2022

All Things Considered

The James Webb Space Telescope (shown here being tested on earth) is expected to reveal some of the most spectacular views of the Universe ever seen. Chris Gunn/Northrop Grumman, NASA hide caption

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Chris Gunn/Northrop Grumman, NASA

Science

A NASA telescope will soon show us the universe as we've never seen it

NASA's $10 billion new telescope showed the world something remarkable today: an image of some of the first galaxies to form in the universe.

The James Webb Space Telescope (shown here being tested on earth) is expected to reveal some of the most spectacular views of the Universe ever seen. Chris Gunn/Northrop Grumman, NASA hide caption

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Chris Gunn/Northrop Grumman, NASA

NASA's James Webb telescope reveals the universe as we've never seen it before

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Manuel Oliver, whose son Joaquin was killed in the Parkland mass shooting, interrupts President Biden as he speaks at an event celebrating the bipartisan Safer Communities Act on the South Lawn of the White House on Monday. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

President Biden touts gun safety legislation, but critics say he's not doing enough

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A pulse oximeter is worn by Brown University professor Kimani Toussaint. The devices have been shown in research to produce inaccurate results in dark-skinned people, and Toussaint's lab is developing technology that would be more accurate, regardless of skin tone. Craig LeMoult hide caption

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Craig LeMoult

When it comes to darker skin, pulse oximeters fall short

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Singer-songwriter Manizha, photographed at Eurovision in Rotterdam on May 16, 2021. She faced a cyberbullying campaign in Russia after voicing opposition to the country's military operation in Ukraine. Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images hide caption

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Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images

A new reality reverberates through Russia's music scene

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Couples hold onto ribbons during a special ritual during a mass wedding event at Lincoln Center on July 11, 2022. Sara Naomi Lewkowicz for NPR hide caption

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Sara Naomi Lewkowicz for NPR

Hundreds of couples didn't have a wedding due to COVID - until now

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