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Paul Reubens poses after a performance of The Pee-wee Herman Show on Broadway in October 2010. Charles Sykes/AP hide caption

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Charles Sykes/AP

Pop Culture Happy Hour

'... But what am I?' Pee-wee Herman creator Paul Reubens dies at 70

Pee-wee's creator, Paul Reubens, died Sunday of cancer. He was 70. Pee-wee was a petulant man-child and a trickster spirit, a burst of joyous id that snuck his brand of anarchy into the mainstream.

Paul Reubens poses after a performance of The Pee-wee Herman Show on Broadway in October 2010. Charles Sykes/AP hide caption

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Charles Sykes/AP

Pop Culture Happy Hour

Pee-wee Herman was more than a boy who never grew up

5 min

Pee-wee Herman was more than a boy who never grew up

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Malevolent robot stories used to be more about brawn than brain — so it was a genuine shock for audiences in 1968 when the sentient HAL-9000 computer calmly said, "I'm sorry, Dave, I'm afraid I can't do that." Above, Gary Lockwood and Keir Dullea in 2001: A Space Odyssey. Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer/Getty Images hide caption

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Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer/Getty Images

'Open the pod bay door, HAL' — here's how AI became a movie villain

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A growing number of doctors and safe sleep advocates are warning about the potential dangers of weighted sleepwear for infants. Oscar Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Oscar Wong/Getty Images

Weighted infant sleepwear is meant to help babies rest better. Critics say it's risky

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E.J. Cuevas (left) and his cousin, Joseph Martinez, stand in front of one of the family shrimping boats. "Every year it gets less and less," Cuevas says of Gulf shrimping. "This is our livelihood — for nothing." John Burnett for NPR hide caption

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John Burnett for NPR

Americans love shrimp. But U.S. shrimpers are barely making ends meet

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