All Things Considered for January 26, 2024 Hear the All Things Considered program for January 26, 2024

All Things Considered

Left: A photo provided by Alabama Department of Corrections shows inmate Kenneth Eugene Smith, who was convicted in a 1988 murder-for-hire slaying of a preacher's wife. Right: Alabama's lethal injection chamber at Holman Correctional Facility in Atmore, Ala., seen in 2002. Alabama Department of Corrections via AP and AP hide caption

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Alabama Department of Corrections via AP and AP

National

Alabama executes man by nitrogen gas for the first time in the U.S.

Kenneth Smith, 58, died at 8:25 p.m. Thursday, after a slew of last-minute appeals to several courts, including the U.S. Supreme Court, failed.

Palestinians try to extinguish a fire at a building of an UNRWA vocational training center that displaced people use as a shelter on Jan. 24, 2024. Ramez Habboub/AP hide caption

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Ramez Habboub/AP

Middle East crisis — explained

'It felt like my head burst': Survivors recount attack on U.N. facility

3 min

'It felt like my head burst': Survivors recount attack on U.N. facility

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Left: A photo provided by Alabama Department of Corrections shows inmate Kenneth Eugene Smith, who was convicted in a 1988 murder-for-hire slaying of a preacher's wife. Right: Alabama's lethal injection chamber at Holman Correctional Facility in Atmore, Ala., seen in 2002. Alabama Department of Corrections via AP and AP hide caption

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Alabama Department of Corrections via AP and AP

National

Alabama executes man by nitrogen gas for the first time in the U.S.

6 min

Alabama executes man by nitrogen gas for the first time in the U.S.

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Chantal Panozzo and her husband, who live in the Chicago suburbs, expected their first routine colonoscopies would be free — fully covered by insurance as preventive care under federal law. Taylor Glascock/KFF Health News hide caption

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Taylor Glascock/KFF Health News

Shots - Health News

The colonoscopies were free but the 'surgical trays' came with $600 price tags

5 min

The colonoscopies were free but the 'surgical trays' came with $600 price tags

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All Things Considered