Fresh Air For July 29, 2019: Why The Planet Needs Insects Hear the Fresh Air program for July 29, 2019

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It may plague your summer peaches and plums, but the fruit fly is "one of the most important animals" in medical research, says conservationist Anne Sverdrup-Thygeson. Sefa Kaya/500px Prime/Getty Images hide caption

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Shots - Health News

Bugged By Insects? 'Buzz, Sting, Bite' Makes The Case For 6-Legged Friends

The decline of Earth's insect population may have serious consequences for humans, says scientist Anne Sverdrup-Thygeson. Insects are the world's janitors, as well as pollinators and a food source.

It may plague your summer peaches and plums, but the fruit fly is "one of the most important animals" in medical research, says conservationist Anne Sverdrup-Thygeson. Sefa Kaya/500px Prime/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Sefa Kaya/500px Prime/Getty Images

Bugged By Insects? 'Buzz, Sting, Bite' Makes The Case For 6-Legged Friends

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Tee Pee Time Arturo Sandoval
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Spink And Forcible Various Artists
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Beautiful Ones The Bad Plus
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