Fresh Air For May 27, 2020: The 'Lost Art' Of Breathing Hear the Fresh Air program for May 27, 2020

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From WHYY in Philadelphia

Breathing slowly and deeply through the nose is associated with a relaxation response, says James Nestor, author of Breath. As the diaphragm lowers, you're allowing more air into your lungs and your body switches to a more relaxed state. Sebastian Laulitzki/ Science Photo Library hide caption

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Sebastian Laulitzki/ Science Photo Library

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How The 'Lost Art' Of Breathing Can Impact Sleep And Resilience

While researching his book, Breath, James Nestor participated in a study in which his nose was completely plugged for 10 days, forcing him to breathe solely through his mouth. "I felt awful," he says.

Breathing slowly and deeply through the nose is associated with a relaxation response, says James Nestor, author of Breath. As the diaphragm lowers, you're allowing more air into your lungs and your body switches to a more relaxed state. Sebastian Laulitzki/ Science Photo Library hide caption

toggle caption
Sebastian Laulitzki/ Science Photo Library

How The 'Lost Art' Of Breathing Can Impact Sleep And Resilience

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Fresh AirFresh Air

From WHYY in Philadelphia