Fresh Air for July 20, 2022: How one WWI surgeon pioneered facial reconstruction Hear the Fresh Air program for July 20, 2022

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From WHYY in Philadelphia

Four American soldiers carry a wounded soldier on a stretcher in Vaux, France, on July 22, 1918. As many as 280,000 World War I combatants were left with facial injuries. Sgt Adrian C. Duff/Getty Images hide caption

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Sgt Adrian C. Duff/Getty Images

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With no textbooks or antibiotics, this WWI surgeon pioneered facial reconstruction

Medical historian Lindsey Fitzharris tells the story Dr. Harold Gillies, a military surgeon who spent WWI reconstructing the faces of soldiers and sailors who'd suffered horrific facial injuries.

Four American soldiers carry a wounded soldier on a stretcher in Vaux, France, on July 22, 1918. As many as 280,000 World War I combatants were left with facial injuries. Sgt Adrian C. Duff/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Sgt Adrian C. Duff/Getty Images

With no textbooks or antibiotics, this WWI surgeon pioneered facial reconstruction

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Fresh AirFresh Air

From WHYY in Philadelphia