Morning Edition for March 17, 2010 Hear the Morning Edition program for March 17, 2010

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'Dragon' lady: Noomi Rapace has been widely hailed for an indelible performance as the unlikely sleuth at the center of Niels Arden Oplev's film. Yellow Bird Productions hide caption

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Yellow Bird Productions

'Dragon Tattoo' Has Designs On U.S. Audiences

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An illegal crop of poppies stands out from a newly harvested crop of wheat in Afghanistan. The opium trade is a key source of income for the Taliban. Julie Jacobson/AP hide caption

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Julie Jacobson/AP

Commandos Crack Down On Afghan Drug Trade

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The government COBRA subsidy allowed blues musician Matthew Skoller and his wife Tina to keep their health insurance — and pay for surgery. Courtesy Matthew Skoller hide caption

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Courtesy Matthew Skoller

Counting On The COBRA Subsidy For Coverage

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It took 35 years for the world to discover Death's bold, surprising rock 'n' roll. Left to right: David, Bobby and Dannis Hackney. Tammy Hackney hide caption

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Tammy Hackney

Death: A '70s Rock Trailblazer, Reborn

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Zhang Huamei — known as "Capitalist Number One" — was just 19 years old in 1979 when she received the country's first-ever license to do private business. She says she applied for the license out of fear of being caught doing business secretly. Shen Cichen/NPR hide caption

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Shen Cichen/NPR

China's Capital Of Capitalism Weathers Recession

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Tiger Woods makes a statement at the Sawgrass Players Club in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla., in February. He apologized for his behavior and confessed to having extramarital affairs. Lori Moffett/AP hide caption

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Lori Moffett/AP

Tiger's Return To Golf A Boon For Various Businesses

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