Morning Edition for May 17, 2010 Hear the Morning Edition program for May 17, 2010

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Pakistani Rangers (in black) goosestep at the Wagah border; India's border guards are in tan. The 30-minute ritual show of force and bluster happens every evening of the year. Hundreds of spectators come to watch the show -- from both sides of the border. John Poole/NPR hide caption

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John Poole/NPR

Steve Inskeep reports

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More airports are using back-scatter scanners like this one at O'Hare International Airport in Chicago. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Scientists Question Safety Of New Airport Scanners

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A cultural war is playing out among Pakistan's youth, pitting fundamentalism against secularism, isolationism versus globalization. Here, female students attend classes at the private Institute of Management Sciences in Peshawar, in Pakistan's North West Frontier Province. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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John W. Poole/NPR

In Pakistan, A Deepening Religious-Secular Divide

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Paramedics and Afghan civilians carry a coffin containing the body of one of five people killed by a roadside bomb in Kandahar in mid-April. Fear has gripped the southern city of Kandahar ahead of NATO's upcoming offensive. Allauddin Khan/AP hide caption

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Allauddin Khan/AP

Violence Drains Hope From Afghans In Kandahar

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Keith Richards says he can still smell the hot and dusty basement where The Rolling Stones recorded Exile on Main Street. How did it smell? "Indescribable." Dominique Tarl hide caption

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Dominique Tarl

Keith Richards: An 'Exile' In France

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