Morning Edition for October 20, 2010 Hear the Morning Edition program for October 20, 2010

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Abu Adel, originally from Nassariya in southern Iraq, has lived in Kirkuk since the 1980s. He says plainclothed men have harassed him, demanding his papers and asking why he hasn't left Kirkuk. Arabs like Abu Adel, lured north in the 1980s with promises of housing and jobs, are now under intense pressure to move back as Kurds repopulate the area. Peter Kenyon/NPR hide caption

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Peter Kenyon/NPR

In Iraq, Counting Heads Is A Political Headache

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Earlier this month, President Obama announced that Deputy National Security Adviser Tom Donilon would replace National Security Adviser James Jones. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Donilon Steps From Behind The Scenes In New Role

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Kodi Smit-McPhee stars as lonely boy Owen in Let Me In, the 2010 remake of a Swedish vampire thriller, Let the Right One In. Saeed Adyani/Overture Films hide caption

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Saeed Adyani/Overture Films

The Real Fears That Fuel Scary-Movie Season

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Thousands of demonstrators rallied in London this fall against harsh austerity measures unveiled Wednesday by the British government. Ben Stansall/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ben Stansall/AFP/Getty Images

Could Drastic Euro-Style Spending Cuts Happen Here?

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Sideline Viewers: More and more football fans are passing on watching the game from the stadium and instead are cheering on their favorite teams from their sofas. gchutka/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Whither The Live-Sports Fan?

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