Morning Edition for November 12, 2010 Hear the Morning Edition program for November 12, 2010

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Tylenol drugs on display at Costco in Mountain View, Calif. To get reimbursed for these over-the-counter drugs by flexible spending accounts, consumers will need a prescription. Paul Sakuma/AP hide caption

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Paul Sakuma/AP

Flexible Spending Accounts Get Less Flexible

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President Obama toasts with Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono during a state dinner in Jakarta on Tuesday. Obama described Indonesia, his childhood home, as a nexus of 21st century challenges and opportunities. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

New To Old: Obama Travels Signal Foreign Policy Shift

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Homeowners can deduct the mortgage interest they pay each year while submitting their taxes, but a new proposal by President Obama's bipartisan deficit commission would eliminate that deduction. Past attempts to cut the incentive have made little headway in Congress. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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Gene J. Puskar/AP

Deficit Panel Targets Mortgage Interest Deduction

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Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi is fighting for his political life over his alleged involvement with a teenage Moroccan pole dancer. Filippo Monteforte/Getty hide caption

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Filippo Monteforte/Getty

Italy's Berlusconi Embroiled In Fresh Sex Scandal

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In village of Ghajar on the Israeli-Lebanon border, a girl looks Thursday at an Israeli soldier as he takes his post. Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has announced a plan to withdraw from the northern half of the village. Uriel Sinai/Getty Images hide caption

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Uriel Sinai/Getty Images

A Split Decision For Israel-Lebanon Border Town

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