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Trane and Wayne Luther Hughes and the Cannonball-Coltrane
Things are Getting Better Luther Hughes and the Cannonball-Coltrane

Even though Facebook remains wildly popular, a number of startup social networks are trying to woo people with the promise of better privacy controls. Nicholas Kamm/AFP hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP

New Networks Target Discomfort With Facebook

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01 Bookmobile
In Motion Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross

Our brains have chemical pathways that make us feel good when we eat, and really good when we eat sweet or fatty foods with high calories. Scientists see these same chemical pathways used in cases of drug addiction. Paul Ellis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Ellis/AFP/Getty Images

Overeating, Like Drug Use, Rewards And Alters Brain

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Tagger Bizingas

In exile since 2008, former Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf has announced his return to politics with the launch of a new political party and a potential run for the presidency. Here, he addresses members of the British Pakistani community in Birmingham in October. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

Musharraf May Gamble On Return To Pakistan

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Little Sunrise Bei Bei & Shawn Lee
Hot Thursday Bei Bei & Shawn Lee
Hung Up [Live] Madonna
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Hung Up [Live]
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The Confessions Tour
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Madonna

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Experts say it's nearly impossible to address U.S. fiscal problems without coming to terms with Medicare. The program provides coverage to 47 million Americans, consumes 12 percent of the federal budget and accounts for $1 of every $5 spent on health care each year. Its future includes 78 million baby boomers. Kirby Hamilton/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Kirby Hamilton/iStockphoto.com

Medicare Key To Conquering Deficit Dilemma

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Showbiz Blues Peter Parcek
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Showbiz Blues
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Mathematics of Love
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Peter Parcek

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Bobby-Q Bobby Parker
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Bobby-Q
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Blues Instrumental Dynamite
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Bobby Parker

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Aaron Hofer, 27, of Bayou La Batre, Ala., has been largely out of work since the BP oil spill. The Iraq veteran and fourth-generation shrimper says if it wasn't for his children, he probably would have already committed suicide. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliott/NPR

BP Spill Psychological Scars Similar To Exxon Valdez

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In Your Darkest Hour Charlie Musselwhite & T-Bone Wolk
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In Your Darkest Hour
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In the Pocket: A Taste of Blues Harmonica
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Charlie Musselwhite & T-Bone Wolk

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Lightning James Cotton
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Lightning
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In the Pocket: A Taste of Blues Harmonica
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James Cotton

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Cornfields in Malawi, like this one, can be used to grow legumes such as pigeon peas, which replenish the soil and are more nutritious than corn. Michelly Rall/Getty Images hide caption

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Michelly Rall/Getty Images

In Malawi, A Greener Revolution Aligns Diet And Land

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"Ma-Ma" FC Ballake Sissoko & Vincent Segal
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"Ma-Ma" FC
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Chamber Music
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Ballake Sissoko & Vincent Segal

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"Ma-Ma" FC Ballake Sissoko & Vincent Segal
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Job applicants stand in a snaking line in Hanahan, S.C., in April 2009 as they wait to get into a job fair. A short-term extension of jobless benefits for some 2 million long-term unemployed expired at midnight Tuesday as Democrats and Republicans in Congress failed to agree on how those benefits should be further extended. Alan Hawes/The Post and Courier/AP hide caption

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Alan Hawes/The Post and Courier/AP

Millions To Lose Unemployment Benefits

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Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence Ryuichi Sakamoto
Laura's Dream Curtis Woodbury

Rabbi Joshua Metzger, his wife Brocha, and their children Menachem Mendel and Sarah Perel stand by a menorah on the first night of Hanukkah in 2005, which fell on Christmas Day. Kathy Willens/AP hide caption

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Kathy Willens/AP

Tracing Hanukkah's U.S. Roots ... To Cincinnati?

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Marvin Miller (right), shown here at a 1976 press conference, served as executive director of the Major League Players Association from 1966 to 1982. Miller has been passed over several times by the Baseball Hall of Fame. A group of former players has started a website honoring Miller. Suzanne Vlamis/AP hide caption

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Suzanne Vlamis/AP

Put Marvin Miller In The Baseball Hall Of Fame

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Baseball Cakewalk Various
Cocekahedron Brass Menazeri

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