Morning Edition for December 17, 2010 Hear the Morning Edition program for December 17, 2010

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Natasha Smahlei, a model, works at the Caitlin Raymond International Registry exhibit in October during the New England Business Expo at the DCU Center in Worcester. Paul Kapteyn/Courtesy of www.telegram.com hide caption

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Paul Kapteyn/Courtesy of www.telegram.com

Law

Mass., N.H. Take Aim At Bone Marrow Registry

3 min

Mass., N.H. Take Aim At Bone Marrow Registry

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An Afghan Shiite Muslim prays in a mosque in Kabul this week, during ceremonies in remembrance of the martyrdom of Imam Hussein, the grandson of the Prophet Muhammad. Afghan Shiites are almost all ethnic Hazaras, who make up about 10 percent of the population and have historically been considered a subservient class in Afghanistan and persecuted by the Taliban. Rafiq Maqbool/AP hide caption

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Rafiq Maqbool/AP

World

Afghan Minority Hazaras Ascending Amid Uncertainty

less than 1 min

Afghan Minority Hazaras Ascending Amid Uncertainty

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The sticker distributed by the Union of Concerned Scientists in San Francisco this week. Union of Concerned Scientists hide caption

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Union of Concerned Scientists

Politics

Long Wait May Be Over For Science Guidelines

4 min

Long Wait May Be Over For Science Guidelines

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Semiconductor computer chips like this one rely on electricity -- positive or negative charges -- to store data. Using high power magnets in a lab, researchers have developed a new way to store data in the spin of an atom's nucleus. HYNIX/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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HYNIX/AFP/Getty Images

Science

Spintronics: A New Way To Store Digital Data

4 min

Spintronics: A New Way To Store Digital Data

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