Morning Edition for August 16, 2011 Hear the Morning Edition program for August 16, 2011

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Murmansk, Russia, is the largest city above the Arctic Circle. If Russia follows through with plans to explore for oil and natural gas offshore in the Arctic Ocean, the city and its port could see significant economic benefits. David Greene/NPR hide caption

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David Greene/NPR

Race To The Arctic

Russia Pushes To Claim Arctic As Its Own

7 min

Russia Pushes To Claim Arctic As Its Own

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A TSA employee being trained in behavioral pattern recognition watches passengers in line at Boston's Logan International Airport in 2010. This week, Logan will become the first U.S. airport to require every passenger to go through behavioral profiling. Josh Reynolds/AP hide caption

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Josh Reynolds/AP

National Security

Next In Line For The TSA? A Thorough 'Chat-Down'

5 min

Next In Line For The TSA? A Thorough 'Chat-Down'

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Daphne Wilson (center) and her engineering team review plans for a project at Mitchell International Airport in Milwaukee, Wis. Erin Toner/WUWM hide caption

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Erin Toner/WUWM

Small Businesses, Big Problems

Credit Troubles Teach Entrepreneur Better Business

5 min

Credit Troubles Teach Entrepreneur Better Business

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Jevon Cochran protests in front of a BART train at the Civic Center station in San Francisco on Monday. Jeff Chin/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chin/AP

National

BART Defends Cutting Off Cell Service In Subway

2 min

BART Defends Cutting Off Cell Service In Subway

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A man is pulled off a commuter train at the Civic Center BART station on July 11 in San Francisco after climbing on top of it during a protest against the July 3 shooting by transit police of Charles Blair Hill. On Thursday, BART officials blocked cell service in some stations to prevent another protest. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

Cellular Shutdown Raises Questions Of Free Speech

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In India, the centuries-old tradition of chewing betel leaves, or paan, spread with spices and sweeteners is losing popularity. In this file photo from 2006, an Indian shopkeeper arranges silver foils of paan at his roadside shop in New Delhi. Manan Vatsyayana/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Manan Vatsyayana/AFP/Getty Images

Asia

Chew On This: Indians Trading Betel For Tobacco

less than 1 min

Listen to Corey Flintoff's Story

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Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin talks about the state's response to the drought during a news conference Monday in Oklahoma City. At right is state Emergency Management Director Albert Ashwood. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Sue Ogrocki/AP

National

Heat, Drought Pressure Oklahoma's Water Supplies

2 min

Heat, Drought Pressure Oklahoma's Water Supplies

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A boom sweeps around a tank at a sewage treatment plant in Coos Bay, Ore. Even though sewage water can be treated and cleaned, psychologists say getting the "cognitive sewage" out of the water is much more difficult. Jeff Barnard/AP hide caption

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Jeff Barnard/AP

Environment

Why Cleaned Wastewater Stays Dirty In Our Minds

6 min

Why Cleaned Wastewater Stays Dirty In Our Minds

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