Morning Edition for September 2, 2011 Hear the Morning Edition program for September 2, 2011

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During his three-day bus tour recently, President Obama discussed job creation. At one town hall, he mentioned a training program in Georgia that allows companies to train prospective employees temporarily while they still receive an unemployment check. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Georgia Jobs Program, Lauded By Obama, Has Critics

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An artist's reconstruction of the Tibetan woolly rhino. Woolly rhinos used their flattened horns to sweep snow off of vegetation, a critical adaptation to survive frigid conditions. Image by Julie Naylor hide caption

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Image by Julie Naylor

An Ice Age Beast Evolved To Beat The Cold

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President Obama, joined by General Electric CEO Jeffrey Immelt (left) and plant manager Kevin Sharkey, visits a GE plant in Schenectady, N.Y., in January. Obama has made green jobs a centerpiece of his job-creation program. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Surprising Areas See Growth In Green Jobs

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U.S. Marines patrol with Afghan forces through a harvested poppy field in Northern Marjah in southern Afghanistan's Helmand province, June 6, 2011. Ten years after the fall of the Taliban, progress on U.S. pledges to help Afghanistan is mixed. David Gilkey/NPR/Redux hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR/Redux

In Afghanistan, Reviewing A Decade Of Promises

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O'Connell Street, 1952: Dublin in the 1950s is "perfect noir territory" says writer John Banville (who writes crime fiction under the pen name Benjamin Black). The city's dark history is incorporated into his work. "I am a novelist and therefore a cannibal," he says. "I eat whatever comes near me. Everything is material." Gerry Cranham/Fox Photos/Getty Images hide caption

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Gerry Cranham/Fox Photos/Getty Images

Sleuthing Around Dublin's Darkest Corners

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