Morning Edition for October 25, 2011 Hear the Morning Edition program for October 25, 2011

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Speaking in Las Vegas on Monday, President Obama announced a plan for homeowners to refinance mortgages at low interest rates, if they met certain conditions.

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The Potential Reach Of Obama's Refinancing Plan

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Dr. Brenda Williams, right, with her husband, Dr. Joe Williams, in their Sumter, S.C. medical clinic. The two routinely register their patients to vote. Brenda also seeks out new voters at the county jail.

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A Push To Register New Voters Reaches Behind Bars

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A stack of copies of the newly released biography of Apple co-founder and former CEO Steve Jobs at the Books & Books store in Coral Gables, Fla.

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New Bio Quotes Jobs On God, Gates And Great Design

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At Coral Way Elementary School in Miami-Dade County, students take classes in Spanish in the morning, then switch to English in the afternoon.

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In Miami, School Aims For 'Biliterate' Education

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Claudine Dimitriou owns The Beach, a day spa in Phoenix. She was virtually alone in the shopping complex after investing $80,000 to open her business in December. The bet has finally paid off.

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A Sigh Of Relief For A Rebounding Shopping Center

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Republican presidential candidate Ron Paul is escorted to a ballroom to speak to his supporters during the California Republican Party Convention this September in Los Angeles. The Texas congressman was once a small-town doctor who specialized in delivering babies.

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Before He Delivered For Voters, Paul Delivered Babies

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Illumatek makes windshields that are engraved and lit with fiber optics so motorcycles are more visible on the road. Its founder worked with VETransfer, a nonprofit that connects veteran entrepreneurs with funding and business skills.

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A Business Incubator Gives Funding And Jobs To Vets

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This image released by the SITE Intelligence Group on April 27, 2011, shows Thierry Dol, one of four French hostages held by al-Qaida's North Africa affiliate. U.S. counterterrorism officials are concerned that al-Qaida affiliates in Africa are growing stronger.

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U.S. Worries Grow Over Al-Qaida's African Presence

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Joseph Kony, leader of the Lord's Resistance Army, in a 2006 photo. The Obama administration has sent 100 troops to advise militaries in Uganda and neighboring countries that are battling Kony's forces.

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Activists Support U.S. Move Against Uganda Rebels

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