Morning Edition for October 28, 2011 Hear the Morning Edition program for October 28, 2011

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Greek's economic problems work their way down the supply chain to people like Kosta Bouyoukas, who imports olives and other foods from Greece. He says suppliers are changing the terms of contracts, and sometimes products don't show up at all.

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Helga Csenki/iStockphoto.com

The Rising Cost Of Doing Business With Greece

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Demonstrators supporting the Occupy Wall Street movement — and an extension of the millionaires tax in New York — protest in Albany on Oct. 21.

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New York Wrestles Over Extending Millionaires Tax

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Blind activist Chen Guangcheng with his wife and son outside their home in northeast China's Shandong province in 2005. He's been held incommunicado at his home for more than a year and has become the focus of a microblog campaign by human-rights activists.

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Chinese Activists Turn To Twitter In Rights Cases

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It took 14 years for stone carvers to create the Mount Rushmore monument, seen here in 1995. Gloria Del Bianco's father, Luigi, led the carving team.

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A Stone Carver's Daughter Tells Of Mount Rushmore

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Stone elephants line a newly inaugurated park dedicated to Dalit, or lower caste, leaders in a suburb of New Delhi, India. Mayawati, a politician known as the "Dalit queen," says previous governments did nothing to honor the leaders who fought for Dalit rights.

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In India, Once-Marginalized Now Memorialized

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Strange, Even As Fiction: Rhys Ifans (right, with Vanessa Redgrave) plays the 17th Earl of Oxford in Anonymous, a political melodrama inspired by a discredited theory about who "really" wrote the plays of Shakespeare.

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For 'Anonymous' Scribe, A Shakespearean Speculation

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