Morning Edition for March 5, 2012 Hear the Morning Edition program for March 5, 2012

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Ryan Shank-Rowe, 9, takes part in a therapeutic riding program at Little Full Cry Farm in Clifton, Va., last month. Maggie Starbard/NPR hide caption

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Maggie Starbard/NPR

Pet Therapy: How Animals And Humans Heal Each Other

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A welder at Specialty Fab in North Lima, Ohio, works March 1 on a piece of a compressor skid frame that is bound for the Ohio Shale project. Manufacturing companies such as Specialty Fab could receive tax breaks if a proposal from the Obama administration goes through. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

Are Tax Breaks The Right Move For Manufacturing?

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Pedestrians walk along a section of Jamaica Avenue in Woodhaven, Queens, New York. The neighborhood is part of an area targeted for congressional redistricting, but the process is still dragging on as the state's primary draws near. Bebeto Matthews/AP hide caption

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Bebeto Matthews/AP

Districts Still Unsettled As New York Primary Nears

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Republican presidential candidates Rick Santorum and Mitt Romney clashed often during Wednesday's GOP debate. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

Inconsistency: The Real Hobgoblin

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Zumba dance classes are all the rage, but some critics say the fitness craze shouldn't be considered Latin dance. Christopher Futcher/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Christopher Futcher/iStockphoto.com

Zumba Is A Hit, But Is It Latin?

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