Morning Edition for March 28, 2012 Hear the Morning Edition program for March 28, 2012

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The final argument the Supreme Court will hear about the new health care law is whether its Medicaid expansion unfairly forces states to participate. Adam Cole/NPR hide caption

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Adam Cole/NPR

Supreme Court's Medicaid Decision Could Reach Far Beyond Health Care

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Shots - Health News

A Struggle To Define 'Death' For Organ Donors

5 min

A Struggle To Define 'Death' For Organ Donors

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A protester blocks an Atlanta street during a rally protesting Georgia's new immigration law in June 2011. Now, the state's lawmakers are considering a bill that would also ban students here illegally from attending all public colleges. John Bazemore/AP hide caption

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John Bazemore/AP

In Southern States, Immigration Law Battle Rages On

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Bill Maher, shown here at a 2011 event in Los Angeles, gave $1 million to the superPAC supporting President Obama's re-election bid. Chris Pizzello/AP hide caption

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Chris Pizzello/AP

Million-Dollar Donors

Bill Maher's Obama SuperPAC Donation Causing Stir

3 min

Bill Maher's Obama SuperPAC Donation Causing Stir

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Alan Lomax (right) with musician Wade Ward during the Southern Journey recordings, 1959-1960. Shirley Collins/Courtesy of Alan Lomax Archive hide caption

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Shirley Collins/Courtesy of Alan Lomax Archive

The Record

Alan Lomax's Massive Archive Goes Online

5 min

Alan Lomax's Massive Archive Goes Online

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Rene Resendez, a 24-year-old uninsured graduate student, used to be a client at the Planned Parenthood in Odessa, Texas, which closed earlier this month because of state budget cuts. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

Health Care

Texas, Feds Face Off Over Planned Parenthood

4 min

Texas, Feds Face Off Over Planned Parenthood

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Fukumoto in one of the numerous period costume dramas he has acted in for the Toei Company's film studios since he began work there in 1959. Toei Kyoto Studio Park hide caption

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Toei Kyoto Studio Park

Movies

In Japan, 'Sliced-Up Actors' Are A Dying Breed

4 min

In Japan, 'Sliced-Up Actors' Are A Dying Breed

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Archer Khatuna Lorig, seen here during the London Archery Classic last October, helped actress Jennifer Lawrence prepare for her role as Katniss Everdeen in The Hunger Games. Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images hide caption

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Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty Images

After 'Hunger Games,' U.S. Archer Shoots For Olympic Games

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Duke freshman Austin Rivers, seen here in the Blue Devils' loss to Lehigh in the NCAA tournament, is leaving school for the NBA draft. The trend of athletes spending only one year in college has hurt the sport, says Frank Deford. Streeter Lecka/Getty Images hide caption

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Streeter Lecka/Getty Images

Sweetness And Light

Watching College Basketball's Slump Into Anonymity

3 min

Watching College Basketball's Slump Into Anonymity

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