Morning Edition for May 10, 2012 Hear the Morning Edition program for May 10, 2012

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Store manager Naoto Higashi models a helmet, a fully stocked kit in his backpack, and a windup flashlight. Such items have become popular in Japan following last year's huge earthquake and tsunami. Lucy Craft for NPR hide caption

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Lucy Craft for NPR

After The Quake, Japanese Shop For Survival

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Graduates of the University of Alabama's class of 2011. The economic downturn has hit recent college grads hard. New data show only half of those who graduated from 2006 to 2011 are working full time. Butch Dill/AP hide caption

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Butch Dill/AP

College Grads Struggle To Gain Financial Footing

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Nurse Susan Peel gives a whooping cough vaccination to a high school student in Sacramento, Calif. The whooping cough vaccine given to babies and toddlers loses much of its effectiveness by the time people reach their teens and early adulthood. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Feds Join Fight Against Whooping Cough In Washington

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Syrians appear behind the damaged windshield of a minibus as they inspect the site of a blast in the central Midan district of Damascus last month. A new jihadist organization in Syria claimed responsibility for the attack. Louai Besharalouai Beshara/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Louai Besharalouai Beshara/AFP/Getty Images

Jihadist Group Complicates Picture In Syria

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The Afghan government wants Muslim preachers to tone down sermons that often criticize the presence of American troops and praise the Taliban. Here, an Afghan youth drags his sheep past a group of men praying at a mosque in Kabul in November 2011. Muhammed Muheisen/AP hide caption

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Muhammed Muheisen/AP

Afghan Goal: Toning Down The Radical Preachers

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In the influential Dark Shadows, a 1960s ABC soap opera with a gothic and supernatural bent, Jonathan Frid played Barnabas Collins, a vampire who returned to claim his coastal Maine manor. Dan Curtis Productions/The Kobal Collection hide caption

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Dan Curtis Productions/The Kobal Collection

'Dark Shadows': The Birth Of The Modern TV Vampire

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