Morning Edition for June 11, 2012 Hear the Morning Edition program for June 11, 2012

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A Syrian man carries a wounded girl next to Red Crescent ambulances following an explosion Friday reportedly targeting a military bus near Qudssaya, a neighborhood in Damascus. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

Syrian Fighting Spreads From City To City

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For more than 200 years, the Supreme Court has interpreted the meaning of the Commerce Clause of the Constitution. Its latest test is the case challenging the Obama health care law. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Health Care Decision Hinges On A Crucial Clause

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A nurse in Washington administers the whooping cough vaccine to a child in May. In response to the epidemic, more than 82,000 adults have also received the vaccine this year. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Doctors Deploy Shots And Drugs Against Whooping Cough Outbreak

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Contact with animals and dirty environments may be one reason farm kids are less likely to get allergies, researchers say. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

To Sniff Out Childhood Allergies, Researchers Head To The Farm

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Facing economic woes, India is looking to trim spending - but cutting government services is extremely unpopular. Instead, politicians are targeting foreign travel and meetings at lavish hotels like the Oberoi in Mumbai. Sajjad Hussain/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sajjad Hussain/AFP/Getty Images

In India, A Different Kind Of Austerity

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A map of the oil pipelines at Al-Sidrah. The man pointing to the map is Abujala Zenati, who had retired as manager of the operation. He says he returned to work after the revolution to help support the new Libya. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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John W. Poole/NPR

Looking To The Future, Libya Erases Part Of Its Past

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African migrants line up to receive a free hot meal provided by a group of Israelis called Soup Levinsky in Levinsky Park in Tel Aviv on Sunday. A court in Jerusalem ruled that Israel could deport South Sudanese nationals back to their home country. JIim Hollander/EPA/Landov hide caption

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JIim Hollander/EPA/Landov

Court's Ruling May Force Africans To Leave Israel

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Outdoor dining spaces are filled on a warm spring day on E. 4th Street in downtown Cleveland. Like many former industrial towns, downtown Cleveland has seen a revival in the last few years to become an urban hotspot. Joshua Gunter/The Plain Dealer hide caption

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Joshua Gunter/The Plain Dealer

Rust Belt Reboot Has Downtown Cleveland Rocking

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Visitors to Bill Wilson's grave in Vermont often leave sobriety chips atop his headstone, marking how long they have been continuously sober. Steve Zind/NPR hide caption

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Steve Zind/NPR

'Bill W.' Day Celebrates Alcoholics Anonymous Hero

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There's No Leaving Now, Kristian Matsson's newest album as The Tallest Man on Earth, comes out Tuesday. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

The Tallest Man On Earth: Tired Of Running

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