Morning Edition for July 30, 2012 Hear the Morning Edition program for July 30, 2012

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American Dana Vollmer celebrates after her gold medal win Sunday in the women's 100-meter butterfly swimming final at the Aquatics Centre in the Olympic Park. Matt Slocum/AP hide caption

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Matt Slocum/AP

In Olympic Swimming, Records Smashed, Hopes Dashed

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A cross-sectional X-ray shows what's called a "sunken chest." The bright circle near the bottom is the spine; the gray blob on the right is the heart. Living LLC/Getty Images hide caption

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Living LLC/Getty Images

Magnets May Pull Kids With Sunken Chests Out Of Operating Room

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When it comes to learning how to drive, your teen is probably as harried as you are. Research shows that scare tactics meant to instill caution, though, are less effective than kind words. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

Cheer Up: It's Just Your Child Behind The Wheel

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Samsung Electronics' Galaxy S (left) and Apple's iPhone 4 are displayed at the headquarters of South Korean mobile carrier KT. Apple claims some of Samsung's designs violate its patents. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Ahn Young-joon/AP

Samsung Fight Among Many In Apple's Patent War

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Writer Karin Slaughter has seen the fallout of some of Atlanta's most gruesome crimes and most dramatic transitions. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

Writer Has A Down-Home Feel For Atlanta's Dark Side

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